British surgeon fined £10,000 after callously branding his initials in a patient’s liver

In one of the more bizarre cases of medical malpractice to hit headlines, a "top surgeon" from the United Kingdom has been convicted on two counts of "assault by beating" after he was caught branding his initials into the liver of one of his patients during a procedure.

The woman whose liver was defaced with this sick form of medical graffiti told the media that she feels like a "victim of rape," and that the incident left her completely violated of her basic human dignity. The perpetrator, 53-year-old Simon Bramhall, openly admitted to committing the act, and now faces a 12-month community service order along with a £10,000 fine.

Bramhall has also resigned from his post at Birmingham's Queen Elizabeth Hospital, where colleagues had first observed Bramhall branding the initials "S.B." on a failed donor liver back in 2014. Bramhall says he did this horrific thing to "relieve tension in the operating theatre," and that it was "naive and foolhardy."

As he walked free from court, however, a woman who had been operated on by Bramhall back in August 2013 revealed the "full horror" of what happened when she was victimized. A victim impact statement explains that this woman was skeptical of the initial claims made against Bramhall, believing them to be "too farcical" – that is, until she realized that she was the patients on whom Bramhall had operated.

"The full horror hit me when a medical professional at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital informed me that it was, in fact, me," the woman stated. "It was what I would imagine the feeling is for someone who is a victim of rape. I was meant to be undergoing a life saving operation. What was Simon Bramhall thinking of? Why did he think that it was appropriate to do this to me?"

Horrific incident causes victim to lose faith in doctors, medical profession

The whole thing was so traumatic for this victim that she now says she no longer has faith in doctors – which isn't surprising considering that other reports have surfaced about Western doctors abusing their anesthetized patients. She also questions whether this act of pompous insanity by Bramhall may have been the reason why the liver transplant itself ended up being a failure.

"My lack of trust in the doctors made me question what could have gone wrong with my new liver," she stated. "I will forever believe in my mind that his branding caused or contributed to the failure of the transplanted liver."

This same woman told the court that she doesn't even like tattoos, let alone having her vital organs branded as if she was a head of cattle. And yet, she's hardly the only patient who was victimized by Bramhall while unconscious, according to reports.

Prosecutor Tony Badenoch told the courts that another patient was also violated by Bramhall – and like the unidentified woman, this person is still suffering ongoing psychological harm as a result of being "violated" by this medical monster.

According to Badenoch, Bramhall apparently used an argon beam machine to "write" his initials on the organs of both patients while they were unconscious, obviously without their consent. A photograph of the four centimeter-high branding was taken using a colleague's mobile phone, and it was later admitted to the court as evidence.

When asked by a nurse about what Bramhall had done, he apparently replied, "I do this," suggesting that there may be other victims out there with branded vital organs they're not aware of.

"This case is about his practice on two occasions, without the consent of the patient and for no clinical reason whatever, to burn his initials on to the surface of a newly-transplanted liver," Badenoch stated before the court.

"Mr. Bramhall had to work exceptionally hard and use all of his skill to complete the operation. At the end of the operation he performed a liver biopsy using the argon beam coagulator, and then used it to burn his initials."

Sources for this article include:

TheSun.co.uk

NaturalNews.com

Comments
comments powered by Disqus

RECENT NEWS & ARTICLES