Losing weight reduces pain throughout the body, not just in load-bearing joints

A new study published in the Journal of Pain has found that weight loss improved pain, fatigue, and depressive symptoms and increased anti-inflammatory molecules of obese patients. The study authors suggest that weight loss intervention done with proper guidance and medical care can improve the lives of obese patients suffering from chronic pain.

  • The study authors wanted to determine how obese patients experience widespread pain and comorbid chronic conditions, such as fatigue and depression.
  • In the study, they assessed how weight loss, even at a small amount, could improve pain and somatic symptoms commonly associated with chronic pain conditions.
  • They gave the 123 participants a low-calorie diet and instructions on how to slowly increase physical activity for a period of 12 weeks.
  • The participants were evaluated and guided by physicians and dietitians who specialized in endocrinology and obesity medicine.
  • The participants completed a questionnaire about their symptoms before and after the weight loss intervention.
  • Results revealed that spatial distribution of pain, fatigue, and depressive symptoms improved after weight loss.
  • Participants who lost 10 percent or more weight showed the greatest improvement — with men showing greater improvement than women.
  • After weight loss, the anti-inflammatory molecules of the participants increased.
  • The study shows that weight loss improved the lives of obese patients with chronic pain, fatigue, and depression.

In conclusion, the study authors suggest that weight loss improves the lives of obese patients with chronic pain, fatigue, and depression as long as it is done with proper guidance and medical care.

Journal Reference:

Andrew Schrepf, Steven E. Harte, Nicole Miller, Christine Fowler, Catherine Nay, David A. Williams, Daniel J. Clauw, Amy Rothberg. IMPROVEMENT IN THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF PAIN, SOMATIC SYMPTOMS, AND DEPRESSION AFTER A WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTION. Journal of Pain, 2017; 18: 12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2017.08.004

Comments
comments powered by Disqus

RECENT NEWS & ARTICLES