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Australian doctor SUSPENDED over social media posts questioning COVID-19 policies, treatment and vaccines


Medical authorities in Australia have suspended a doctor in Sydney because of his social media posts that criticized how medical authorities were treating COVID-19 patients and questioned the effectiveness of vaccines and lockdowns.

Dr. Paul Oosterhuis, an Australian anesthetist who has been practicing medicine for over 30 years, had to present himself to the Medical Council of New South Wales (MCNSW) for questioning. The medical council works with the Ministry of Health of New South Wales to receive and manage complaints regarding individual doctors and other medical practitioners in the state. (Related: Woman in Australian quarantine camp harassed by cops for removing face mask to drink tea.)

Oosterhuis criticized vaccines, COVID-19 treatments and lockdown

On Sept. 2, the medical council released a statement confirming that it received at least two anonymous complaints regarding Oosterhuis’ social media activity.

According to the organization Doctors For COVID Ethics, Oosterhuis posted information on his social media accounts regarding COVID-19.

“Over the last 18 months, I have been increasingly concerned about the misinformation and censorship creeping into science and medicine,” said Oosterhuis.

In one of the posts, Oosterhuis urged medical authorities to tell COVID-19 patients to take vitamin D, zinc and to treat their patients with ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine.

In other posts, Oosterhuis questioned the evidence used by the Australian government to justify its repressive lockdowns and mask mandates. He called lockdowns “totalitarian,” and said they were causing “massive damage society-wide.”

Finally, Oosterhuis also posted content on his social media accounts that pointed out that vaccines have low effectiveness and there are serious risks and harms to taking them. One of the dangers he pointed out was the possibility of antibody-dependent enhancement. This is when antibodies produced by vaccines are insufficient at dealing with the disease. Instead of defeating the disease, the antibodies help it become deadlier.

“The risk of antibody-dependent enhancement of disease … driven by immune escape from the selective evolutionary pressure of vaccinating with a non-sterilizing agent is a real and present danger and needs to be discussed,” wrote Oosterhuis. “The danger to millions is distressing me, and discussing that danger is, I believe, unarguably in the public interest.”

The MCNSW flagged Oosterhuis’ social media activity. They asked him to attend an “immediate action panel” on Sept. 3. This is one of the most serious panels the council can call up. This action is only used when the council believes “a complaint or notification prompts serious concerns about risk to public safety or the need to otherwise act in the public interest.”

On Sept. 3, the MCNSW released a statement confirming that the council had met with Oosterhuis and that it has decided to suspend the doctor’s medical registration.

In its statement, the council said it suspended Oosterhuis “in order to protect the health and safety of the public and to maintain confidence in the medical profession.”

The medical council has the power to suspend medical practitioners in New South Wales under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (NSW). But the council pointed out that this law does not grant it punitive powers and it does not have the ability to de-register Oosterhuis and take away his medical license. But the suspension already prevents him from practicing medicine.

The MCNSW refused to make any further public statements on the matter. It has referred Oosterhuis’ suspension with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA).

AHPRA confirmed that it had received concerns regarding medical professionals who failed to meet the agency’s code of conduct obligations.

“Experience tells us that most practitioners, when concerns are raised directly with them, modify their behavior to become compliant,” wrote a spokesperson to The Epoch Times. “In a small number of cases, national boards are likely to take action to ensure the actions of the practitioner do not place the public at risk of harm.”

Oosterhuis has indicated he will not change his behavior to be more compliant. He said he plans to appeal the suspension.

“I am very disappointed by the Medical Council’s decision to suspend my registration,” he wrote on his social media accounts. “The material I submitted in support of my evidence-based concerns was not considered. I intend to appeal the decision.”

Learn more about doctors like Oosterhuis who strive to inform people about scientifically proven ways to combat the pandemic at Pandemic.news.

Sources include:

TheEpochTimes.com

Downloads.MCNSW.org.au 1 [PDF]

Doctors4CovidEthics.org

Downloads.MCNSW.org.au 2 [PDF]

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